The Investment Scientist

Archive for March 2021

My long-term readers will remember that since I started writing investment missives, I have always advocated small-cap value investing. That is, holding a broadly diversified portfolio but with a weighting tilt towards small-cap value stocks. 

Up until 2014, the historical evidence is overwhelming. Literally, since there have been stock market data, looking at rolling ten-year periods (see chart below,) there have been only two ten-year periods when small-cap value stocks under-performed large-cap growth stocks, ending in 1998 and 1999 respectively. These ten-year periods corresponded to the dot-com tech-stock bubble in the US.

Read the rest of this entry »

I wrote this article in 2007. It’s every bit as valid today as 14 years ago.

I am an amateur pilot. I remember vividly an episode that happened during my training a few years ago. That was a very windy day. Up to that point, I had only experience flying in calm weather. As soon as my Cessna took off, I immediately felt the difference. My plane was tugged and pulled in all directions by crosswinds. I felt like I was losing control of the plane, and fear swelled up from the bottom of my spine to the top of my head. I sat stiffen in the pilot seat and my sweaty palms grabbed tightly at the control handles like a sinking person grabbing onto a straw.

My trainer sensed my tenseness and she asked: “Are you OK?”. Not willing to acknowledge my fear, I asked her instead: “Is it more dangerous to fly in turbulent weather like this?” The trainer smiled and said: “It is not more dangerous to fly in turbulent weather. The plan was built to withstand any turbulence. But occasionally, an amateur pilot would lose his cool and do something stupid. That’s the real danger.

Read the rest of this entry »

Author

Michael Zhuang is principal of MZ Capital, a fee-only independent advisory firm based in Washington, DC.

Twitter: @mzhuang

Error: Please make sure the Twitter account is public.

Archives

%d bloggers like this: